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Some Days

Some days, I can forget about the loss, beat back the longing to curl up beside my mommy and be the daughter and not the parent. Some days, when we visit we can just plain connect. One human to another. Yesterday was one of those visits. I arrived at the Long Term Care home to find Mom awake and alert. Since much of her conversational skills are gone, talking about any one topic for more than a sentence at a time is difficult. But yesterday, there was a book. The book on the table was three stories merged into one book with a scattering of drawings throughout. First it was pictures of lions and jungle animals, second of historical black and white photos of the Rockefeller family and finally drawings of people riding horses and carriages.  Since reading the book wasn't a practical option, we started making up our own stories - silly stories at that.

In that moment, I was able to find her, connect with her. It was nice. 

There are days, just like you, that I really wish this long journey could be over. I wish that Mom could be freed from this body bogged down by this horrible disease. But yesterday, I was grateful." No Mom, you can't remember your grandchildren, what you had for lunch or very much about me, we still can share the love of two people who share a beautiful history together. Even if one of them doesn't remember it.

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A Grief Unobserved

Mom's dementia and life at the nursing home feels pretty normal now. The shock and surprise of the disease has lost its sting. My mission has gone from rescuing her from crisis to seeing that she lives out her days in safety - feeling loved and affirmed with her dignity intact. Most days I can live with thatBut, then something happens that reminds me how sad it all really is and how much I hate this disease!

Today is one of those days.

Today I learned one of my mother's best friend's husband just passed away. My automatic reaction was: "Oh dear, I have to tell Mom" and then I remember. First, I can't tell Mom because it is possible it might upset her, triggering responsive behaviours. Second, there is a good chance she might not actually remember the people I am talking about. She hasn't seen them since her life was hijacked by dementia. But even more it reminds me that "that" mother is the loyal and laughing friend who loved and mourned with people - is already gone. How do I mourn a person who is gone yet present? It reminds me of the one thing that makes my heart ache is that there is no funeral for slow death by dementia. There is no joyous celebration of life for people who are still here. It makes me angry too. I can't help but feel my mom is getting ripped off. This women who spent her whole life loving and serving others dies a little every day right before our eyes. By the time, my mother breathes her last, she will have actually been gone for years. People will tell me that it is for the best - and they will be right. So today, please join me as I grieve the mom who is gone and love the mom that remains.

Mom's dementia and life at the nursing home feels pretty normal now. The shock and surprise of the disease has lost its sting. My mission has gone from rescuing her from crisis to seeing that she lives out her days in safety - feeling loved and affirmed with her dignity intact. Most days I can live with that. But, then something happens that reminds me how sad it all really is and how much I hate this disease! Today is one of those days. Today I learned one of my mother's best friend's husband just passed away. My automatic reaction was: "Oh dear, I have to tell Mom" and then I remember. First, I can't tell Mom because it is possible it might upset her, triggering responsive behaviours. Second, there is a good chance she might not actually remember the people I am talking about. She hasn't seen them since her life was hijacked by dementia. But even more it reminds me that "that" mother is the loyal and laughing friend who loved and mourned with people - is already gone.

How do I mourn a person who is gone yet present?

It reminds me of the one thing that makes my heart ache is that there is no funeral for slow death by dementia. There is no joyous celebration of life for people who are still here. It makes me angry too. I can't help but feel my mom is getting ripped off. This women who spent her whole life loving and serving others dies a little every day right before our eyes. By the time, my mother breathes her last, she will have actually been gone for years. People will tell me that it is for the best - and they will be right. So today, please join me as I grieve the mom who is gone and love the mom that remains.

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Finding Hope in Gratitude

 

Dementia and hope don't really go together. As I mentioned in my last post, I've been struggling a little lately coping with my Mom's dementia. Nothing has really drastically changed, but in our latest visits she has been more distant, less aware and harder to find. I feel myself growing discouraged, fatigued and less hopeful. In fact, I think the word "hope" is the issue. In every other area of my life - with my work, my children, my friends - even if things are not the way I want them to be, there is something to look forward to. I can hope. But, when I look at Mom and where she is going - there is not much to hope for - I see nothing in her future but more layers of loss. SO, today I am doing something to shake myself out of this funk:

 I am practicing gratitude.

Maybe it will help - here's hoping. Maybe you'd like to join me. Although, Mom is not how we wish she could be, right now in this moment, there are things about her for which I am grateful.

1. I am totally and completely grateful for the staff in her long term care facility. Their care is person centered, when they speak with my mother - I can tell by the look in their eyes, that they "see" her - not just a bothersome old lady. They are funny, warm and approachable. They welcome my questions and concerns. When Mom is "off" they notice and are pro-active. Because of them, Mom is warm, well-fed, and safe. I am so grateful.

2. I am grateful for her big sunny single room with the little love seat for two and for the moments we can sit and cuddle in privacy and quiet.

3. I am grateful that her eyes still light up and a big smile crosses Mom's face almost every time she sees me. She may not be exactly able to identify me every time - but she still knows me, loves me and feels loved in return. I am so grateful for that.

4. I am grateful for all the volunteers who come in and talk with Mom, sing, perform jamborees, preach and pray with her. I am grateful for the other residents who she enjoys their company and friendship - even her limited way - and the family members of other residents who have taken an interest in my mom. Thank-you!

5. Most of all, I am grateful that even though it can be heart breaking,  I have the gift of more time with Mom. I really am thankful for those moments of connection, love and intimacy. They are a gift and I am grateful for them. Maybe, I won't find hope in my gratitude, but I might just find joy. :) ~Sharon

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Looking for Easy Answers in a Difficult World

 

Looking for Answers

I’ve heard it said, “The more I learn, the less I know.”

In many ways, this blog and this journey I have been on, since my mom became ill, has been about finding answers. What’s going on with my mother? What are these terms and services I do not understand? What should I do?

But, the longer I am on this road, the more I understand, that my first sentence is becoming true in my life. The more I learn, the less I know.

It wasn’t until a few weeks back, while sharing my mom’s story at the Emerging Priorities in Aging, Providence Care, Research and Innovation Day, that I had this little epiphany.

There I was in the room full of doctors, geriatric nurses, specialists, geriatric psychiatrists, heads of hospitals and nursing homes, surrounded by the people who know “everything”. I finally got up the nerve to ask a question that has been burning within me (without me even knowing it). This is the question that has lived there below the surface, marinating in guilty feelings – “What should I have done differently?”

In this room full of the smartest of the smarts, there was a long silence.

Even as the words came out of my mouth, I realized I haven’t been looking for answers, but one magic answer. What should or could I have done to “fix” my mom. Guess what? There are no easy answers. Elder care and any mental health issue is a complex, multifaceted situation. There are social, spiritual, physical and mental factors all taking place at one time.

SO, why do we rush to these easy answers? Well, that is the second part of my epiphany: Control.

When we feel vulnerable, frightened, out of control, we grapple for simple solutions, to ease our discomfort with the unknown. We want to feel in control again. Beware of making choices while in this state of mind. I can promise you they won’t be wise decisions. To fix these feelings we do many things: we deny, we blame, we over react, under react, make sudden life altering choices and much more.

Yes, sometimes in crisis we have to make decisions quickly, but always examine your motives. Ask, read, consider, and learn as much as you can and go with what you know and let go of the guilt. The longer I write this blog, answer people’s letters and speak to people, the more I find myself saying: “I don’t know.” It isn’t the easy answer, but it is the true one.

Yet, let me walk beside you as we walk this difficult journey together. We’re going to make it.

Sharon

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Enjoying the Moments

 

Well, summer is wrapping up and I can hear the call of September in the back of my mind; calling me back to schedule, productivity and more of a routine. Although, I hate to say good bye to sunny afternoons spent by the pool, another part of me looks forward to moving into another season of life. I feel an optimism bubbling up as I begin to hope for new experiences and opportunities.

But, one of the difficulties of caring for an aging parent or spouse is that it is difficult to find that hope. When we look ahead to this season of their life, there is no spring, summer or fall left – only the cold realities of winter. How can I look forward to this season of caregiving when all I predict is the inevitable losses that will occur? My mother will lose more of her memory, physical abilities and personality. This year I witnessed many caregivers at my mother’s nursing home say goodbye to their spouses and parents. Reality tells me it is only a matter of time.

Yet, I am learning things from my mother. I may look ahead to the future, but the truth is:all we really know and have is the moment we are in right now. None of us know what tomorrow will bring. If we could somehow let go of those future moments we hold on to, try to control, manipulate and worry about, imagine how peaceful and productive our lives would be.

The summer was a fairly uneventful one for my Mom. The most exciting thing was she was well enough to come to my daughter’s wedding ceremony. She not only saw her sisters, all her children and most of her grandchildren, but she was able to remember (at least in part) being there.

While I may not see much to be hopeful about in her future, I am committed to enjoy the moments we are given. I am committed to “finding her” and making that connection that only she and I can make as often as possible.

Someday those moments, those memories will be cherished gifts.

P.S. Speaking of memories, it has been one year since I began this web blog. When I think about how much I have experienced because of it, the people I have met (in person and online), the opportunities I have to had speak because of it and the healing I have experienced through it – I am truly grateful! Thanks for sharing in my caregiving journey.

Blessings,

Sharon Osvald

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Top Weekend Reading Picks

 

My Mother’s Caregiver has done some surfing and here are this week’s the Top Weekend Reading Picks for Caregivers. Hope you find it helpful!

Alzheimer’s isn’t funny…no, but a little humour goes a long way. See: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marie-marley/dementia_b_1548683.html

Giving too much? A Report on Compassion Fatigue and the health risk to caregivers:http://life.nationalpost.com/2012/06/05/giving-too-much-compassion-fatigue-a-real-risk-for-caregivers/

Read this report about Seniors in Need, Caregivers in Distress: www.healthcouncilcanada.ca

An interesting article, A Caregiver’s Silent Burden: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dorothy-sander/the-caregivers-silent-bur_b_1570584.html?show_comment_id=159516373#comment_159516373,sb=2977190,b=facebook

A great blog on caregiver stress and burnout (know the signs!)                                                http://www.medicalsuppliesblog.com/2012/04/25/caregiver-stress-and-burnout-do-you-know-the-signs/

A great link to elder caregiving resources and information in South Eastern Ontario: http://www.sagelink.ca/

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Top Weekend Reading Picks

 

Here again are My Mother’s Caregiver’s Top Weekend Reading Picks for this week:

Working out family caregiver rates:

http://myeldercareconsultant.com/2012/05/19/aging-parents-caregiving-contracts/

How Technology is helping seniors:

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/Health+care+best+technology/6647110/story.html

Nursing Home Fix Needs Provincial Dollars:

http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/article/1179609–nursing-home-fix-needs-provincial-dollars-industry-says

Keeping seniors in nursing homes safe from abuse:

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/life/health/ont-nursing-homes-need-flexibility-to-handle-abusive-staff-residents-report-151715445.html

Helping Seniors Stay Put:

http://www.chathamdailynews.ca/2012/05/16/helping-seniors-stay-put

A Business Approach to Caregiving:

http://www.alumnigazette.ca/issues/spring-2012/a-business-approach-to.html

A television journalist, Joan Lunden’s Caregiving Story:

http://www.greenwichtime.com/news/article/Caring-for-mom-Joan-Lunden-talks-about-life-in-3553284.php

 

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That's Enough for Now

 

The look on my children’s faces makes my heart sink a little.

It is the look I see every time we’re around their grandmother. It isn’t exactly fear, but it is close. Despite their obvious attempts to be brave and friendly, they look more like they’re talking to a stranger than to the woman who rocked them to sleep when they were only babes.

I understand it. They aren’t the only ones who make that face. I see it in many people who knew and loved the pre-dementia version of my mother. Today they don’t know what to say or where to look. An uncomfortable silence hangs over the room and the visits get less and less frequent.

In the beginning, it used to make me angry. People stopped asking how Mom was and she seemed so forgotten. I felt like they’d abandoned Mom…and abandoned me. After a while it just made me sad. Couldn’t they see what I see? Couldn’t they see that she was still in there?

But I’m learning it is very wrong for to judge them.  After all, I’ve been visiting my mother three times a week for over a year. I have gotten used to the way she spills her food when she eats, the losses to her memory, reasoning and conversation- but I didn’t always feel this way. Initially, these changes rocked my very world. I have had more time to process and accept her shocking physical and mental changes. But for others the loss is genuine; in reality for them the woman they knew and loved is gone.

When Mom first began showing signs of Dementia, her good friend Betty phoned me. Betty’s mother had recently passed away after battling Alzheimer’s. She laid out the naked truth before me and warned me of the ugliness that was coming our way. She didn’t try and sugar coat it. Yet still, she talked with such fondness about the wonderful privilege and blessing she’d had being able to care for her mother. I will never forget the way she talked. I left the phone call feeling encouraged and honoured. Most days I still feel that way.

I’ve been able to experience an intimacy in being my mother’s caregiver that has kept me from losing all of her – the way others have. Today was one of those days. While visiting, Mom and I began acting silly and I crawled up into the bed with her like old times. Lying there cuddling and laughing, I was able to enjoy that sacred moment and cherish it without wishing for the moments when her mind was whole and her body was strong.

I remembered that even bitter sweet moments are still sweet. I told Mom I loved her and she responded as only she could, “We still have each other and that’s enough for now.”

P.S. I just wanted to thank you, the readers, for spreading the word about My Mother’s Caregiver and to extend a welcome the new members of this community. Today alone there were an amazing 130 page views, as well as several likes and comments. How exciting!  

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My Mother's Caregiver's Top Weekend Reading Picks

 

This is the week of Accolades for My Mother’s Caregiver:

 

 My Mother’s Caregiver made SHORTLIST OF FINALISTS THE WORD GUILD, 2012 CANADIAN CHRISTIAN WRITING AWARDS in the Article Blog Series Category for the Posts: “The Reluctant Visitor” and “Pushing Past the Guilt and Worry”:http://www.thewordguild.com/

 

 

 

 

 

A very inspiring Blogger Award:http://authenticgecko.com/a-very-inspired-blogger-award-oh-my/

Beautiful Blogger Award:http://letstalkaboutfamily.wordpress.com/2012/04/25/beautiful-blogger-award-and-versatile-blogger-award/

My Mother’s Caregiver Top Weekend Reading Picks:

If you are in a “helping” profession, you may want to read an article I co-wrote about “Compassion Fatigue”. Take a look at Winnie’s blog at: www.winnievissercounselling.com

I love this devotional post called “To Be” that reminds us of the simple things in life and how to embrace them: http://travelingthenarrowroad.wordpress.com/2012/04/25/to-be/

A Caregiver’s story and need for support in their grief:http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2012/04/23/3185321/charlotte-caregiver-needs-support.html

A very good article touching on some of the family strain that comes with caregiving, 7 Ways to Forgive: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/7-ways-to-forgive-your-parent-or-spouse.html

 

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Herbie's Tomatoes

 

 

Having elderly parents or being a caregiver to a relative or spouse can bring out a lot of emotions during the Christmas season.

Lisa Gilmore, activity director at Applefest Lodge Retirement Home, whose father is battling Alzheimer’s, decided that happy memories were the best antidote for this. She is our guest blogger with her story: Herbie’s Tomatoes~S.O.

In travelling the Alzheimer’s road with my father and his wife, I have tried to remind myself and my brothers, as much as I can, to keep a sense of humour.

Dad was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s for 7 years but it took 3 years to get that diagnosis. I noticed something was going on before that and suggested he get tested.  When he was first diagnosed he said “I have short term memory loss.” Even with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s,  his doctor would not take his driver’s licence.  Looking back, I think his hoarding and lack of focus at work was probably happening for years. He covered well. The brain is a powerful force.

Dad is now being fed by the staff, which I know is the next stage. I am prepared. I know what to expect. I know it gets worse. I also know that as a daughter living six hours away there is not much I can do except be the voice on the phone.

We are still hoping for one more day of “the old Herb”. I pray Dad and his wife have one more Christmas with things as “normal” as they can be. I just wanted to share one of the funny memories I have of my Dad.

So here is to all the caregivers and their loved one’s. Have a Blessed Christmas!

 Herbie’s Tomatoes

Herbie is my Dad. Now Herbie is not the most horticulturally minded man on the planet. He tried. For my mother’s sake he tried. I will never forget the image of my dad planting tomatoes one year.

We lived in a small house with a smaller yard that my mother, with her gardening magic, transformed into a backyard and front yard oasis. There were a few portulacas amongst the rock garden in front and beautiful morning glories in the back to greet the birds and butterflies.

I remember the day she asked my Dad to pick up some tomato plants -six she said. She didn’t have room for vegetables. So six he bought -six boxes with six plants ineach. You do the math. With about a dozen of the yummy fruit on each plant there were just too many to stick in the ground. So mom planted what she needed and loving cared for her tomatoes.

Dad began to stick tomato seedlings wherever he could. He must have gotten tired because I still remember him actually sitting on a stool at the side garden with a spoon trying not to waste a plant.

We all laughed that we could just reach out the back door and grab a tomato. And all of Grandma Pearl’s recipes got tried out that year. Even fried green tomatoes -before anyone else had even heard of them.

To this day, many years later I still love the smell and taste of a good ripe tomato and can’t help picturing my Dad, now in his 70’s, planting tomatoes with a spoon.

By Lisa Gilmore

(Photo of Dad and family three years ago)

 
 
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Caring for the Caregiver

 

Ok, so I know I wrote only a few short weeks ago about walking away from guilt and worry, but well…it’s a process right?

You see, now that Mom has been living in the nursing home for several months, I have grown attached to other residents and recently some of them have passed on. The fresh reality and emotion that comes with this is surprising to me. I know (with my mind) that I shouldn’t be shocked when elderly people die or their rooms are replaced with new residents, but oddly enough, I am. Worry reminds me that we’re not finished being blind-sided. One day we too will say goodbye to Mom and her room will take on another, just as if she was never there.

So, the other night I’m lying in bed (bummed out and wallowing in it) staring at the ceiling taking turns between the these two bad-boy emotions when suddenly, with absolute clarity I recalled a conversation I had with my mother – back when she was still telling me what to do.

Just after my father had passed away, I became overwhelmed with a sense of responsibility for my mother. She was almost 80 at the time, but was far from needing a caregiver. Yet, in my mind I had jumped in line and assumed the role. How would she cope on her own? They lived in a small village and had to drive to get anything. She didn’t like to drive. Could she afford things on her own?  What if she had an emergency – she was alone and so far away? Between the visits, the anxious phone calls and heavy conversations (all initiated by me) Mom figured it out and sat me down for “the talk”.

“You have got to stop worrying about me,” she said. “First of all, you have your own family to care for and secondly, Our Heavenly Father is looking after both of us – and He started looking after me long before I met your Dad.”

As her words came to my mind I had to laugh out loud. Wouldn’t she be ticked off if she knew I was losing sleep over her well-being? Age, sickness – even death – they come whether we worry about them or not. Instead we exchange faith, hope and peace of mind for a false sense of control, thinking: “If I think about the problem, I must be doing something about it.”

Mom would have wanted me to care for her, but not become consumed by her care. Yes, our parents and the people who we care for they need our care, our support and our love- but not our preoccupation. It doesn’t help us and it doesn’t help them.

So, I return to my place of faith remembering whose daughter she really is

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Pushing Past the Guilt and Worry

Pushing Past the Guilt and Worry

Well, in case you’re wondering – I did see the twinkle. Despite being a reluctant visitor, I was blessed with not only the twinkle – but also the whole sparkler! When I arrived for the visit I delayed, I found my mother awake, smiling, dressed nicely with a fresh new haircut. I just shook my head, reached out my hand and accepted the gift – one more good day with Mom.

For whatever reason, Mom is back on the upswing. Yesterday I called her “Old Girl” and she gave my butt a slap and reminded me that if she got her shoes on she could still chase me down the hall. Laughter replaced fear and reminiscing took the place of paranoia.

Before our care giving journey began I knew that people with Alzheimer’s were forgetful, sometimes paranoid and delusional, but I had not anticipated her behaviour cycles: weeks of good – crash – slow rebuilding trust and clarity – weeks of good days- crash. That appears to be my mother’s pattern. Unfortunately, it doesn’t always correspond with holidays like Mother’s Day or when her out of province visitors arrive. Yet, for now Mom is back- in part.

The whole experience gets under your skin though. It leaves me late at night asking questions in the dark. What will happen to me as I age? Will my husband get like this and will I become his caregiver? What will the future hold? How will I cope?

One of the comments from Betty J. to my last post echoes this sentiment. She writes, “Now we worry about how we will affect our kid’s lives as we age. We really have to have faith that things will be revealed as we go along.”

Guilt and worry are the two thieves in the night that come in and rob our sleep and peace of mind. We look back and say, “What could I have done better? What if I had seen the signs before? What if we’d encouraged her more not to sell her house and set up supports for her there – would she still be with us in heart and mind?” Guilt laughs are our helplessness and keeps us spinning and when we’re finished chewing on that bitter pill, worry is right behind it.

One of the benefits of getting past thirty…ok…forty…is that I’ve finally learned that life cannot be controlled, managed or manipulated. We all are dealt a hand that is different – and for the most part what we get is what we get. Yes, we must be wise with our exercise, eating and caring for the bodies we are given, but the rest is a mystery.

This realization can do two things to us. It can paralyse us with fear and anxiety or we can rest in its peace. It is true we will age. If we live to be as old as my mother we will say good-bye to those we love. We may be touched by cancer, dementia and loss. But, knowing there are still so many good moments to grasp should keep us in the here and now. Knowing we are not in control means we can relax and enjoy the gifts that come our way and not be robbed by worry or guilt. What’s done is done and what is to come will come, but today is a gift. As my friend Betty says, “We really have to have faith that things will be revealed as we go along.”

Today I choose to push past the guilt and worry and have faith.

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Check out the Changes

 

Three months ago I was so frustrated with blogging I went to bed in tears calling Blogger and Word Press names like stupid and … well, other things. But if you sit at your computer for hours and hours, for enough days in a row and long enough, you start to figure it out – at least a little.

In August I began www.mymotherscaregiver.com  to support caregivers and http://sosvald.blogspot.comto write my heart out. Finally, after alot of thought and editing I’ve managed to bring the two sites under one roof.

Now there are links  on this site that will take you both to my blog: Life Reflections…Wit, Words and Wonder  (http://sosvald.blogspot.comand also information about Sharon Osvald Communications.

Click around and feel free to leave a comment.

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Waiting for Home

No one likes hospitals.

One of the scariest and most exhausting aspects of caregiving is when your loved one has to be hospitalized. This is especially true when you are waiting for them to be placed in a nursing home.

Most times, hospitals are not designed to meet a senior’s long term needs. There’s not enough recreational or mental stimulation, exercise and patients run a greater risk of getting sick. For the families watching and waiting it can be very difficult.

When my mom was hospitalized we waited almost four months for her to be placed in a home that was in our area. For more remote locations this wait is even longer.

What are the wait times like where you live?

See the article: Arnprior feeling the elder-care crunch

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A Sad So Long

 

 

This Saturday, a friend and former co-worker, Donna Cooper passed away after battling cancer. It’s hard to believe that at Christmas time she just thought there was something wrong with her back and today she is gone.

I know it sounds so typical, but Donna really was a special person. She was a little fire cracker of a woman with a heart of compassion and a wild sense of humour. While scrolling through my cell phone photos I found one of her standing on a chair dancing. She made everyone laugh. She spoke the truth in love. She made the world a better place.

Donna believed that her soul was secure in her Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and I believe that she is finally at rest in His presence. 

There were people who cared for her in her last days, her husband, family and close friends. This is not only a tribute to Donna, it is a tribute to those caregivers, for their great love and their great loss.

We’ll miss you Cooper!

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Mom to Mom to Mom

Working from home has some perks. Having time to get my laundry done is one. But lately, for the first time since my children were very little, I have been able to join a ladies coffee break group one morning a week. This group – called Mom to Mom – is a faith-based group and allows mothers to encourage and support each other emotionally and spiritually. There are also caffeinated beverages and sweets so I was pretty pumped to be a part of this.

It was at our first gathering when asked to introduce ourselves that I recognized there had been a change in the way in which I define myself. After mentioning the existence of my daughter and son, I felt the strongest compulsion to mention my mother. When I let the opportunity pass, I almost felt guilty.

Welcome to the sandwich generation I thought. I don’t just need a Mom to Mom group, I need a Mom to Mom to Mom group! It turns out one such group just might exist. The term sandwich generation refers to people caught between the often-conflicting demands of raising children and caring for aging parents or other relatives. According to a Stats Canada people caring for seniors are more likely to be women who are employed and married. Like me, some 15% of sandwiched workers reduced their hours, 20% had to change their schedules and 10% lost income.

 Don’t get me wrong, I am not complaining. This is a role I have offered to take, but just like when I decided to have children I had no idea what I was signing up for. Once it happens to you, you are never the same – for better and for worse. Just like parenting, when Mom is not doing so well, I can find myself feeling resentful, helpless and most often GUILTY. But when we have a good day, I feel elated, I tuck that experience away and cherish it for the fleeting moment it was.Then I thank God and get up to live another day.

But right now I have to get off this computer, go visit Mom at the nursing home so I can be on time to pick up my son :)

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Work in Progress

 

If you happen to have stumbled across this blog you must be thinking – Is THAT it?

The answer is I am working on it. :) Not a real techno-person I have been learning the technology and figuring out things as I go along. There will be AMAZING, WONDERFUL, POWERFUL moving content on this page – very soon. So visit and visit often.

In the meantime, since I live in Eastern Ontario. Here is a local resource you might want to check out a book launch is happening for author and realtor, Julie Wilson at the Quinte West Public Library in Trenton, Ontario. She is sharing from her experience with her mother and clients insights about selling your home and preparing for life in the later years. If you plan on attending call 1-855-803-2220. To purchase the book or find out more info visit: www.beyondthesoldsign.ca.

MORE TO COME….

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